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How to Easily Remove and Clean Epoxy From
Nearly Any Surface

Installing an epoxy floor is a great way to give any space a durable, long-lasting, and aesthetically stunning new look. Still, even the most well-prepared for epoxy installations can lead to a little mess. That’s no problem because we’re going to look at how to easily remove and clean epoxy from nearly any surface!

How to Safely and Effectively Remove Epoxy

Epoxy resin is a great tool when you want to redo your flooring or take on a number of other projects. However, when it splashes somewhere that it shouldn’t while you’re working it’s important to know how to remove the epoxy safely and effectively.

First of all, it’s worth noting that you can take a few steps to minimize the mess epoxy can make before you get started. For one, always wear gloves when working with epoxy and replace them often if you need to. To keep resin out of your hair, tie it up if it’s long. As for your clothes, wear something you don’t mind getting messy or wear a cover. Lastly, make sure to lay out a plastic liner to protect the area around your workspace.

When resin does manage to slip through the cracks, there’s not quite a blanket technique. You’ll need to account for factors such as the surface the epoxy is on and whether it’s cured yet. Keep reading and we’ll break down how you can get epoxy off of almost anything!

Which Tools Do I Need to Remove Epoxy?

The exact tools and steps you’ll need to take to remove epoxy can where the spill is. For a quick reference, this table lists the common tools you’ll need to clean up uncured and cured epoxy spills.

Uncured Epoxy

  • Dry Cloth
  • Solvent such as isopropyl alcohol or acetone
  • Putty knife
  • Rubber gloves
  • Safety goggles

Cured Epoxy

  • Dry Cloth
  • Solvent such as an adhesive remover, denatured alcohol or paint thinner
  • Putty knife
  • Rubber gloves
  • Safety goggles

How to Remove Epoxy from Skin

You should always wear gloves when you work with epoxy. However, even with all safety measures taken, you might find that you’ve managed to get some on your skin. Don’t panic! You have a few options.

White vinegar is a pretty common household item that can help here. Even better, it works on both cured and uncured epoxy. As the resin on your hands softens, you can wash it away.

Another common household item you might have on hand is acetone. Typically the go-to choice to remove nail polish, acetone is a great answer to how to get resin off hands. That said, use acetone with care as it’s flammable and not good to inhale in large quantities.

Start by adding a bit of acetone to a paper towel or cotton ball. From there, start to gently scrub the epoxy glue on your skin. It should soften and come away. Make sure that once you’re done with the acetone you wash your hands thoroughly.

If you have a citrus-based waterless hand cleaner around, this works wonders as well. To use this, all you need to do is start by putting some on a cloth. Then, start working on the epoxy with the cleaner and running warm water.

Remember, epoxy resin isn’t good for your skin. It’s a good idea to wash your hands and apply lotion after removing the resin to restore them.

How to Remove Epoxy from Wood or Concrete

Now, let’s take a look at how to remove epoxy from concrete or wood. Given that epoxy is often used for flooring, it’s not an uncommon problem to run into. After all, you want your epoxy flooring where it belongs, not overlapping into another room or onto a sidewalk!

Especially in the case of wood, there are some chemicals that you will really want to avoid. For wood and concrete, you should leave harsh options like paint thinner behind. Even common choices like isopropyl alcohol or denatured alcohol can potentially cause discoloration or damage. Instead, turn to acetone like we discussed in removing epoxy from your skin.

When you try to scrape the epoxy away, do so carefully. You don’t want to scrape the wood by pressing too hard or using too sharp of a tool.

All you have to do is dampen the spot that you’re cleaning in acetone. It should soak in enough to help make the epoxy pull away from the surface. As for the leftover acetone, you won’t have to worry. After a while, it’ll evaporate away.

How to Remove Epoxy from Plastics or Glass

If you’re worried about how to remove epoxy from glass or plastic, the good news is that it’s more manageable than you might think. You’ll need the following tools:

  1. Isopropyl alcohol
  2. For stubborn epoxy, you may also need denatured alcohol or paint thinner
  3. A scraper tool like a putty knife for stubborn epoxy
  4. Paper towels
  5. Damp rag

To start, put a bit of isopropyl alcohol on a clean paper towel. You can use this to start scrubbing away the epoxy. In some cases, you might find the epoxy resin is particularly stubborn. In these cases, use the same steps you took with the isopropyl alcohol but use denatured alcohol instead. If you don’t have denatured alcohol, paint thinner is often a reliable alternative.

If you really can’t get the epoxy off, a scraper may help. You’ll want to try this method gently to avoid damaging the glass or plastic.

Once the epoxy is free of the surface, grab your rag dampened with warm water. This will help remove any remaining cleaner from the window.

How to Remove Epoxy from Metal and Hard Surfaces

Fortunately, removing epoxy from a hard surface like metal is that you don’t have to worry about damage as much. Still, check that the method that you’re considering won’t damage the specific type of hard surface or metal in question.

In most cases, you can use a chemical adhesive remover on surfaces like metal. These removers come with instructions from the manufacturer as to how to correctly use their specific formula. Again, make sure to wear protective gear and double-check that the solution in question is safe for the specific surface.

Another option that metal can often handle is freezing small spots of epoxy off. The best way to do this is to use a spray refrigerant. From there, you can use a putty knife to scrape the epoxy away – it should just chip off.

Even if you work with refrigerant over a chemical adhesive remover, don’t skip out on protective gear. It’s also always best to work in a well-ventilated area when possible to avoid breathing in any harmful fumes.

How to Remove Epoxy from Fabrics

It might seem like the end of your clothes if you notice there’s a spot of epoxy on your shirt. It’s true that removing epoxy from fabrics takes some careful choices but you have options.

First, let’s discuss what to avoid. We’ve talked about a lot of methods thus far including using options like acetone or alcohol to remove epoxy. If you use these materials on fabric, you might find your clothes discolored.

On the bright side, you have a little more mobility with your clothes. This means that you can rely on heat by placing your clothes in boiling water. You only have to dip them in for a few moments before pulling them out and peeling off the epoxy.

Before doing this, make sure your clothes aren’t damaged by heat. Synthetic materials are more likely to incur damage but the heat may shrink certain fabrics as well. Most of the time, cotton or linen fabric is safe for this.

Remove of Uncured & Cured Epoxy Resin

Removing uncured and cured epoxy is a little different because of the consistency of the epoxy.

To start, let’s look at how to remove uncured epoxy which is epoxy that hasn’t been set yet. A good first step is to use your putty knife to remove as much of the epoxy as you can. Once you’ve done this, you’ll want to take a rag and soak it in your solvent. This could include denatured alcohol, lacquer thinner, acetone, or another option depending on the material the epoxy is on.

Follow the appropriate removal steps we’ve discussed above depending on the material to make sure you achieve the best results. You can use a damp cloth to remove any remaining cleaner before drying the area off.

The same method won’t quite work as for how to remove cured epoxy. After epoxy has cured, you can start with a putty knife. Yet, this is more effective if you have a heat gun on hand to soften the epoxy. However, sometimes you can chip cured epoxy off of a surface. In this case, you’ll want to reach for a solvent like paint thinner since it’s a little stronger than a solvent like isopropyl alcohol.

An epoxy floor is a gorgeous and practical choice for any floor. Still, you probably want your epoxy floor coating to stay, well, on the floor. If you do run into any trouble, though, you’re prepared with these tips on removing epoxy from nearly any surface!

Looking for an Epoxy Contractor In Your Area?

Leave your information and a professional will contact you soon!

How to Easily Remove and Clean Epoxy From Nearly Any Surface

Installing an epoxy floor is a great way to give any space a durable, long-lasting, and aesthetically stunning new look. Still, even the most well-prepared for epoxy installations can lead to a little mess. That’s no problem because we’re going to look at how to easily remove and clean epoxy from nearly any surface!

How to Easily Remove and Clean Epoxy From
Nearly Any Surface

Epoxy resin is a great tool when you want to redo your flooring or take on a number of other projects. However, when it splashes somewhere that it shouldn’t while you’re working it’s important to know how to remove the epoxy safely and effectively. First of all, it’s worth noting that you can take a few steps to minimize the mess epoxy can make before you get started. For one, always wear gloves when working with epoxy and replace them often if you need to. To keep resin out of your hair, tie it up if it’s long. As for your clothes, wear something you don’t mind getting messy or wear a cover. Lastly, make sure to lay out a plastic liner to protect the area around your workspace. When resin does manage to slip through the cracks, there’s not quite a blanket technique. You’ll need to account for factors such as the surface the epoxy is on and whether it’s cured yet. Keep reading and we’ll break down how you can get epoxy off of almost anything!

Which Tools Do I Need to Remove Epoxy?

The exact tools and steps you’ll need to take to remove epoxy can where the spill is. For a quick reference, this table lists the common tools you’ll need to clean up uncured and cured epoxy spills.

Uncured Epoxy

  • Dry Cloth
  • Solvent such as isopropyl alcohol or acetone
  • Putty knife
  • Rubber gloves
  • Safety goggles

Cured Epoxy

  • Dry Cloth
  • Solvent such as an adhesive remover, denatured alcohol or paint thinner
  • Putty knife
  • Rubber gloves
  • Safety goggles

How to Remove Epoxy from Skin

You should always wear gloves when you work with epoxy. However, even with all safety measures taken, you might find that you’ve managed to get some on your skin. Don’t panic! You have a few options. White vinegar is a pretty common household item that can help here. Even better, it works on both cured and uncured epoxy. As the resin on your hands softens, you can wash it away. Another common household item you might have on hand is acetone. Typically the go-to choice to remove nail polish, acetone is a great answer to how to get resin off hands. That said, use acetone with care as it’s flammable and not good to inhale in large quantities. Start by adding a bit of acetone to a paper towel or cotton ball. From there, start to gently scrub the epoxy glue on your skin. It should soften and come away. Make sure that once you’re done with the acetone you wash your hands thoroughly. If you have a citrus-based waterless hand cleaner around, this works wonders as well. To use this, all you need to do is start by putting some on a cloth. Then, start working on the epoxy with the cleaner and running warm water. Remember, epoxy resin isn’t good for your skin. It’s a good idea to wash your hands and apply lotion after removing the resin to restore them.

How to Remove Epoxy from Wood or Concrete

Now, let’s take a look at how to remove epoxy from concrete or wood. Given that epoxy is often used for flooring, it’s not an uncommon problem to run into. After all, you want your epoxy flooring where it belongs, not overlapping into another room or onto a sidewalk!

Especially in the case of wood, there are some chemicals that you will really want to avoid. For wood and concrete, you should leave harsh options like paint thinner behind. Even common choices like isopropyl alcohol or denatured alcohol can potentially cause discoloration or damage. Instead, turn to acetone like we discussed in removing epoxy from your skin.

When you try to scrape the epoxy away, do so carefully. You don’t want to scrape the wood by pressing too hard or using too sharp of a tool.

All you have to do is dampen the spot that you’re cleaning in acetone. It should soak in enough to help make the epoxy pull away from the surface. As for the leftover acetone, you won’t have to worry. After a while, it’ll evaporate away.

How to Remove Epoxy from Plastics or Glass

If you’re worried about how to remove epoxy from glass or plastic, the good news is that it’s more manageable than you might think. You’ll need the following tools:

  1. Isopropyl alcohol
  2. For stubborn epoxy, you may also need denatured alcohol or paint thinner
  3. A scraper tool like a putty knife for stubborn epoxy
  4. Paper towels
  5. Damp rag

To start, put a bit of isopropyl alcohol on a clean paper towel. You can use this to start scrubbing away the epoxy. In some cases, you might find the epoxy resin is particularly stubborn. In these cases, use the same steps you took with the isopropyl alcohol but use denatured alcohol instead. If you don’t have denatured alcohol, paint thinner is often a reliable alternative.

If you really can’t get the epoxy off, a scraper may help. You’ll want to try this method gently to avoid damaging the glass or plastic.

Once the epoxy is free of the surface, grab your rag dampened with warm water. This will help remove any remaining cleaner from the window.

How to Remove Epoxy from Metal and Hard Surfaces

Fortunately, removing epoxy from a hard surface like metal is that you don’t have to worry about damage as much. Still, check that the method that you’re considering won’t damage the specific type of hard surface or metal in question.

In most cases, you can use a chemical adhesive remover on surfaces like metal. These removers come with instructions from the manufacturer as to how to correctly use their specific formula. Again, make sure to wear protective gear and double-check that the solution in question is safe for the specific surface.

Another option that metal can often handle is freezing small spots of epoxy off. The best way to do this is to use a spray refrigerant. From there, you can use a putty knife to scrape the epoxy away – it should just chip off.

Even if you work with refrigerant over a chemical adhesive remover, don’t skip out on protective gear. It’s also always best to work in a well-ventilated area when possible to avoid breathing in any harmful fumes.

How to Remove Epoxy from Fabrics

It might seem like the end of your clothes if you notice there’s a spot of epoxy on your shirt. It’s true that removing epoxy from fabrics takes some careful choices but you have options.

First, let’s discuss what to avoid. We’ve talked about a lot of methods thus far including using options like acetone or alcohol to remove epoxy. If you use these materials on fabric, you might find your clothes discolored.

On the bright side, you have a little more mobility with your clothes. This means that you can rely on heat by placing your clothes in boiling water. You only have to dip them in for a few moments before pulling them out and peeling off the epoxy.

Before doing this, make sure your clothes aren’t damaged by heat. Synthetic materials are more likely to incur damage but the heat may shrink certain fabrics as well. Most of the time, cotton or linen fabric is safe for this.

Remove of Uncured & Cured Epoxy Resin

Removing uncured and cured epoxy is a little different because of the consistency of the epoxy.

To start, let’s look at how to remove uncured epoxy which is epoxy that hasn’t been set yet. A good first step is to use your putty knife to remove as much of the epoxy as you can. Once you’ve done this, you’ll want to take a rag and soak it in your solvent. This could include denatured alcohol, lacquer thinner, acetone, or another option depending on the material the epoxy is on.

Follow the appropriate removal steps we’ve discussed above depending on the material to make sure you achieve the best results. You can use a damp cloth to remove any remaining cleaner before drying the area off.

The same method won’t quite work as for how to remove cured epoxy. After epoxy has cured, you can start with a putty knife. Yet, this is more effective if you have a heat gun on hand to soften the epoxy. However, sometimes you can chip cured epoxy off of a surface. In this case, you’ll want to reach for a solvent like paint thinner since it’s a little stronger than a solvent like isopropyl alcohol.

An epoxy floor is a gorgeous and practical choice for any floor. Still, you probably want your epoxy floor coating to stay, well, on the floor. If you do run into any trouble, though, you’re prepared with these tips on removing epoxy from nearly any surface!

Looking for an Epoxy Contractor In Your Area?

Leave your information and a professional will contact you soon!

epoxy floor contractor

Looking For An Epoxy Contractor In Your Area?

Leave your information and a professional will contact you soon!